NFV and SDN on OpenStack for network operators

Canonical

Canonical

on 11 March 2015

Front Cover

Network Functions Virtualisation (NFV) and Software-Defined Networking (SDN) are two of the hottest infrastructure technologies around, particularly for telecoms and network operators wanting to map their services in a more efficient, scalable, and cost-effective way.

One of the biggest areas of interest for operators as they look to integrate those technologies is to have a quick and easy way to deploy and map them onto cloud infrastructure, particularly OpenStack. This whitepaper gives an overview of the ever-changing infrastructure landscape for network operators, and the challenges they face when implementing NFV and SDN technologies.

The eBook also presents a reference architecture for integrating NFV and SDN technologies onto Ubuntu OpenStack clouds, allowing for maximum flexibility in configuration, management, and scaling.

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