DataArt release new version of Alexa Virtual Device for Raspberry Pi

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Guest

on 16 May 2017

This is a guest post by DataArt. If you would like to contribute a guest post, please contact ubuntu-devices@canonical.com

This project aims to provide the ability to bring Alexa to any Linux device including embedded systems like Raspberry Pi or DragonBoard boards. The binary release is packed into a snap package, which is a perfect way to deliver this project.

Short instructions to run it with snap:
You need to create your own Alexa Device on the Amazon developer portal. Follow this manual to create your own device and security profile – https://github.com/alexa/alexa-avs-sample-app/wiki/Create-Security-Profile
Add http://alexa.local:3000/authresponse to the Allowed Return URLs and http://alexa.local:3000 to the Allowed Origins.
Connect an audio device: a microphone and speakers to your device. It could be a USB headset for example.
Install the PulseAudio snap:

sudo snap install --devmode pulseaudio

Install the Alexa snap from the store:

sudo snap install --channel beta alexa

Open http://alexa.local:3000 in a web browser on a local device or a device on the same network. Note: the app provides an mDNS advertisement of the local domain alexa.local. This is very helpful for using with monitorless devices.

Fill in the device credentials that were created during step 1, click ‘log in’. Note: the voice detection threshold is a float value for adjusting voice detection. The smaller the value, the easier it is to trigger. You may need to adjust it for your mic and voice.

Fill in your amazon credentials.

Now you can speak with Alexa. The app uses voice activation. Say ‘Alexa’ and the phrase that you want to say to her. The app makes a beep via in speakers when it hears the ‘Alexa’ keyword and starts recording.

Enjoy Alexa without the need to buy special hardware 🙂

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