Securing IoT device data against physical access

Sarah Dickinson

Sarah Dickinson

on 26 February 2019

Security remains the number one concern when designing and deploying IoT devices. High profile breaches continue to occur and concerns cease to subside. For any organisation, security needs to be front of mind and considered from the start – not as an afterthought. Having no mechanism in which to address security concerns can be as significant as threatening the survival of a business.

Many organisations have adopted Ubuntu Core to help manage the security and integrity of their IoT devices. Ubuntu Core features leading security credentials and protects against online threats. However, with many IoT devices deployed remotely, how can organisations ensure protection against physical access and the data on those devices?

This whitepaper gives a technical overview of how Ubuntu Core with full disk encryption and secure boot can be implemented to provide protection in such scenarios including a case study of this in practice.

Highlights of this whitepaper include –

  • The built in benefits of Ubuntu Core such as confinement and isolation to provide best in breed security.
  • Overview of how full disk encryption and secure boot was implemented on Ubuntu Core for a customer to provide tamper resistant access and data protection for remotely deployed devices.
  • Using the NXP i.MX6 application processor as a reference platform, explanation of how these features can be extended to other hardware platforms to provide similar security capabilities.

To download the whitepaper, click here or fill out the form below.

Internet of Things

From home control to drones, robots and industrial systems, Ubuntu Core and Snaps provide robust security, app stores and reliable updates for all your IoT devices.

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